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Characteristics of a Conclusion Statement on GMAT Critical Reasoning


Use this video to understand the characteristics of a Conclusion Statement on GMAT Critical Reasoning. The concepts in this video will prove valuable in solving question in the verbal section on GMAT.


Characteristics of a Conclusion Statement on GMAT Critical Reasoning


In GMAT critical reasoning questions, each passage has a central point, and a statement expressing this point is called a conclusion statement. In this short article, we will cover the characteristics of a conclusion statement and how to identify one on the GMAT.

The Conclusion Statement


The conclusion must be the main point of the reasoning, the reason why the argument was made. Remember, when we say that the conclusion statement must represent the main point of the passage, we mean from the author's point of view. Now, let us illustrate this concept through a sample question.

The Author's Main Point is That...


A typical conclusion statement question, on the GMAT, takes the form of "The author's main point is that..." with the answer choices being potential conclusion statements. Please carefully go through the following example.

The GDP of Xitora has grown by 15% during the tenure of the current political party. This is the highest growth since any tenure over the previous 100 years. Since the GDP growth is a fine indication of the economic growth of a party, the party has been applauded for its role in the achievement. However, the party is unlikely to win another term in the upcoming elections. Certain socio-political moves by the incumbent government have led to severe public outcry. As a result, recent opinion polls reflect a steep decline in the popularity of the party.

Mind Map: High GDP growth--> party deserves credit--> party's socio-political moves have been criticized--> polls show a decline in popularity--> the party is not likely to win again.

Now we shall go through some potential answer choices, one by one, to see how to eliminate inappropriate options in a conclusion statement question.

Option 1 - The party's efforts need to be applauded.
This choice is incorrect. While this information is mentioned in the passage, it is part of the premise, not the conclusion.

Option 2 - The party has failed on socio-political fronts.
This information cannot be inferred, much less serve as a conclusion. The passage only states that the party's socio-political moves have led to public outcry; this is not enough to conclude that the party has failed on these fronts.

Option 3 - The party's actions on socio-political issues have led to severe public outcry.
This is a fact stated in the passage but it is not the conclusion. The conclusion is what the argument was written to say. The argument here has not been written to suggest that there was an outcry, it seems to have been written to suggest that the party will not win another term.

Option 4 - The popularity of the party has declined in recent times.
This is close, but it is not the conclusion.

Option 5 - The opinion polls reflect a decline in the popularity of the party.
This is a fact mentioned in the passage but it is not the reason why the argument was written; it is simply a piece of supporting evidence.

Option 6 - The party will lose the upcoming elections.
This is a trap. The language used here is that "the party is unlikely to win", which is not the same as saying that it will certainly lose.

Option 7 - The party will take serious corrective socio-political measure before the election.
This is speculation, thus it cannot be inferred and cannot be a conclusion.

Option 8 - The party is likely to lose the upcoming elections.
This is the main point of the passage, a very fine conclusion statement.

This article has deliberately been kept brief; for a more elaborate explanation, please refer to Experts' Global's Stage One Critical Reasoning videos.

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